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Angela's Vision: Freedom from Rape and Freedom for Black Women in America

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abstract
Black Women have long endured rape and sexual violence. Despite being raped, Black women have always resisted rape. This thesis analyzes activist Angela Davis’ rhetoric around sexual violence on Black women. Davis’ primary rhetorical strategy is noted as slavery and rapist accountability. Her belief in accountability serves to free the victim of any blame, while getting to the origin of this current epidemic. Davis has laid the groundwork for many current Black women activists, so that analysis of her impact on them is necessary. In this thesis, I analyze Tarana Burke, the founder of the ‘Me Too’ Movement, to address the impact of Davis’ methods while speaking to the larger societal progress. Burke’s rhetoric of healing addresses the survivor of sexual violence, while also advocating for their freedom and progress. Embedded throughout this analysis are the tropes of power and purity; and the ways in which power and purity are interpolated in the rhetorical strategies of accountability and healing. The final rhetorical strategy is that of the Black woman—and how she represents freedom in symbolic form. This thesis addresses the embodied experience of Black women in activism, such as Davis and Burke; and the complexity and strength of participatory rhetoric in the fight for Black women’s freedom.
subject
Angela Davis
Me Too
Power
Purity
Rape
Tarana Burke
contributor
Monroe, Amber (author)
Von Burg, Alessandra (committee chair)
Atchison, Robert J (committee member)
French, Nathaniel T (committee member)
Lewis, Janaka (committee member)
date
2019-05-24T08:35:47Z (accessioned)
2020-05-31T08:30:18Z (available)
2019 (issued)
degree
Communication (discipline)
embargo
2020-05-31 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/93968 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
Angela's Vision: Freedom from Rape and Freedom for Black Women in America
type
Thesis

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