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Spinal Muscle Changes and Occupant Injury Risk Prediction in Spaceflight

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abstract
Significant skeletal muscle atrophy occurs in crewmembers of long-duration spaceflights. Exposure to long-duration microgravity reduces muscle mass, particularly in the legs and back. Research on muscle atrophy during long-duration spaceflight has primarily focused on the lower extremities, so limited data are available to characterize loss in the supporting spinal musculature. Atrophied and weakened spinal musculature paired with vertebral bone loss could reduce an astronaut’s performance on a mission and affect their quality of life upon return to Earth, since lost muscle and bone mass is not immediately restored. In particular, the combination of spaceflight-induced muscular strength decrement, sensorimotor impairment, reduced postural stability, and bone deterioration may predispose astronauts to vertebral fracture due to falls and/or dynamic loading encountered in spacecraft launches and landings.
subject
Astronaut
Finite Element Modeling
Microgravity
Muscle Atrophy
Sled Testing
contributor
McNamara, Kyle Patrick (author)
Weaver, Ashely A (committee chair)
Gayzik, Francis S (committee member)
Beavers, Kristen M (committee member)
Lenchik, Leon (committee member)
date
2019-05-24T08:35:52Z (accessioned)
2021-05-23T08:30:11Z (available)
2019 (issued)
degree
Biomedical Engineering (discipline)
embargo
2021-05-23 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/93995 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
Spinal Muscle Changes and Occupant Injury Risk Prediction in Spaceflight
type
Dissertation

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