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Sensitivity and Extensibility of Finite Element Human Body Models for Thoracic Injury Evaluation in Automotive and Spaceflight Environments

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abstract
While automotive occupants and spaceflight crewmembers are at risk for similar blunt trauma injuries, the loading conditions and resulting injury mechanisms surrounding these potential injury scenarios are contrasting. In the automotive environment, motor vehicle crashes (MVC) are rare events, whereas crewmembers are subject to increased accelerations during each rocket launch and crewed capsule landing. The duration of impacts in MVCs is typically shorter (with the exception of rollovers) and more severe than in spaceflight scenarios. However, because of the isolated environment and increased costs associated with spaceflight compared to automotive transportation, there is a much lower tolerance for injury.
subject
Biomechanics
Chest
Crash
Finite Element Modeling
Injury
Thorax
contributor
Gaewsky, James (author)
Stitzel, Joel D (committee chair)
Stitzel, Joel D (committee member)
Weaver, Ashley A (committee member)
Gayzik, F Scott (committee member)
Danelson, Kerry A (committee member)
Gabler, H Clay (committee member)
date
2019-09-05T08:35:17Z (accessioned)
2021-09-04T08:30:13Z (available)
2019 (issued)
degree
Biomedical Engineering (discipline)
embargo
2021-09-04 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/94302 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
Sensitivity and Extensibility of Finite Element Human Body Models for Thoracic Injury Evaluation in Automotive and Spaceflight Environments
type
Dissertation

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