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COMPLEX NETWORK ARCHITECTURE, WHITE MATTER MICROSTRUCTURE, AND COGNITIVE DEFICITS IN TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY AND POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER

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title
COMPLEX NETWORK ARCHITECTURE, WHITE MATTER MICROSTRUCTURE, AND COGNITIVE DEFICITS IN TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY AND POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER
author
Singleton, Omar
abstract
The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan from 2001 to 2014, officially designated as Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), and Operation New Dawn (OND), respectively, have resulted in more than 2.5 million Veterans from these conflicts who have now returned to the United States, struggle to reintegrate into society, and suffer from high rates of physical and psychological trauma and injury. The impact of TBI and PTSD are especially devastating and collectively reduce quality of life for OIF/OEF Veterans, with prevalence of TBI and PTSD among these Veterans estimated at 6.7 to 20% and 29.3%, respectively. Comorbidity of TBI and PTSD is common and impacts recovery and outcomes in addition to complicating our understanding of the neurobiology of these conditions. There remains a gap in the characterization of brain structure and function in TBI, especially blast-related TBI, and PTSD. Considering that the burden of TBI and PTSD on Veterans has widespread societal implications, understanding the complex relationship between structural, functional, and cognitive changes induced by these conditions is extremely important. The aims of the present study were to (a) characterize the functional network architecture of the brain in blast TBI and PTSD; (b) investigate the effects of neurotrauma on overall white matter tracts and limbic-related white matter tracts; (c) evaluate the extent to which blast TBI interacts with PTSD to impact brain structure and function; and (d) examine the disparity in neurological effects and outcome based on minority status.
subject
cognition
dti
fmri
network science
neuroimaging
contributor
Godwin, Dwayne (committee chair)
Hamilton, Craig A (committee member)
Rowland, Jared A (committee member)
date
2020-01-08T09:35:21Z (accessioned)
2022-01-07T09:30:12Z (available)
2019 (issued)
degree
Health Disparities in Neuroscience-related Disorders – MS (discipline)
embargo
2022-01-07 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/95948 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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