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EXAMINING SEX DIFFERENCES AND THE ROLE OF AN AMYGDALAR CIRCUIT IN RODENT MODELS FOR COMORBID ALCOHOL USE DISORDER AND ANXIETY DISORDERS

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abstract
Alcohol use disorder is a debilitating neurological disorder which affects millions of Americans each year. Even more prevalent are negative affective disorders, which are comprised of both depressive disorders and anxiety disorders. Alcohol use disorder and negative affective disorders are highly comorbid, meaning an individual with one disorder is at an increased risk to develop the other as well. Much remains unknown as to the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying this comorbidity. The studies at hand aim to contribute to this understanding. The initial study seeks to determine whether or not sex differences exist in common assays of anxiety-like behavior in rodent models. The second study aims to determine the role of two non-overlapping amygdalar circuits in anxiety-like and drinking behaviors. Together, the objective of these experiments is to contribute to the existing pool of literature in the hopes that it is able to inform and develop treatments and therapeutics for comorbid alcohol use disorder and anxiety disorders.
subject
alcohol use disorder
amygdala
anxiety
behavioral models
rodent models
sex differences
contributor
Baldassaro, Alexandra D (author)
Weiner, Jeffrey L (committee chair)
Ferris, Mark J (committee member)
Raab-Graham, Kimberly F (committee member)
date
2020-01-08T09:35:24Z (accessioned)
2020-01-08T09:35:24Z (available)
2019 (issued)
degree
Neuroscience (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/95951 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
EXAMINING SEX DIFFERENCES AND THE ROLE OF AN AMYGDALAR CIRCUIT IN RODENT MODELS FOR COMORBID ALCOHOL USE DISORDER AND ANXIETY DISORDERS
type
Thesis

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