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Synapsin-based approaches to brain plasticity in adult social insects

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abstract
Development of the mushroom bodies continues after adult eclosion in social insects. Synapsins, phosphoproteins abundant in presynaptic boutons, are not required for development of the nervous system but have as their primary function modulation of synaptic transmission. A monoclonal antibody against a conserved region of Drosophila synapsin labels synaptic structures called microglomeruli in the mushroom bodies of adult social insects, permitting studies of microglomerular volume, density, and number. The results point to multiple forms of brain plasticity in social insects: age-based and experience-based maturation that results in a decrease in density coupled with an increase in volume of individual microglomeruli in simultaneous operation with shorter term changes in density produced by specific life experiences.
subject
adult social insects
brain plasticity
contributor
Fahrbach, S.E. (author)
Van Nest, B.N. (author)
date
2020-02-25T20:32:03Z (accessioned)
2020-02-25T20:32:03Z (available)
2016-12 (issued)
identifier
SE Fahrbach, BN Van Nest. 2016. Synapsin-based approaches to brain plasticity in adult social insects. Current Opinion in Insect Science 18:27-34 (citation)
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cois.2016.08.009 (doi)
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/95992 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Elsevier
rights
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ (uri)
source
Current Opinion in Insect Science
title
Synapsin-based approaches to brain plasticity in adult social insects
type
Article

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