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RGS2 PROTEINS REGULATE DOPAMINE SIGNALING AND COCAINE SELF-ADMINISTRATION VIA DOPAMINE D2 AUTORECEPTORS

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abstract
Dopamine (DA) is critically involved in the etiology of drug addiction. A key modulator of DAergic transmission is the dopamine D2 autoreceptor (D2AR), which couples to Gαi/o proteins to inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity. The D2ARs located on midbrain DAergic neurons modulate DA neuron firing as well as DA synthesis, release, and reuptake through a negative feedback mechanism. Extensive preclinical evidence has consistently shown that chronic exposure to psychostimulants reduces D2AR function, which is associated with vulnerability to relapse. Newly emerged preclinical and clinical data indicate that low levels of D2AR expression and function are associated with enhanced drug reward. To date, there is a significant knowledge gap in understanding the cellular regulation of D2AR activity by drugs of abuse.
subject
Cocaine
D2 Dopamine Receptor (D2R)
Dopamine
Drug Addiction
G protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR)
Regulator of G protein Signaling (RGS) Proteins
contributor
Luessen, Deborah Joyce (author)
Chen, Rong (committee chair)
Martin, Thomas J (committee member)
McCool, Brian A (committee member)
Howlett, Allyn C (committee member)
Jones, Sara R (committee member)
Ferris, Mark J (committee member)
date
2020-05-29T08:35:36Z (accessioned)
2020 (issued)
degree
Physiology and Pharmacology (discipline)
2022-05-28 (liftdate)
embargo
2022-05-28 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/96789 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
RGS2 PROTEINS REGULATE DOPAMINE SIGNALING AND COCAINE SELF-ADMINISTRATION VIA DOPAMINE D2 AUTORECEPTORS
type
Dissertation

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