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INVESTIGATIONS OF HEAD IMPACT FREQUENCY AND MAGNITUDE IN COLLEGIATE WOMEN’S SOCCER

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abstract
Soccer is the most popular sport in the world, and although it is not often thought of as a collision sport, the concussion rate in soccer is relatively high, especially among women. At the collegiate level, the concussion rate of women’s soccer is nearly double that of men’s soccer and only slightly lower than football. However, most head impacts that occur in soccer are non-concussive (i.e., they do not result in acute signs or symptoms of concussion). Still, there is evidence that exposure to repetitive head impacts is associated with functional and structural changes to the brain even in the absence of a clinically diagnosed concussion. To try to understand the biomechanical basis for these changes, previous studies have quantified on-field head impact exposure in soccer, but the measurements of head kinematics (i.e., head motion) from these studies may be limited by the accuracy of the wearable sensors used.
subject
concussion
head impact exposure
headers
repetitive head impacts
soccer
subconcussive impacts
contributor
Filben, Tanner Matthew (author)
Stitzel, Joel D (committee chair)
Miles, Christopher M (committee member)
Urban, Jillian E (committee member)
date
2020-05-29T08:35:38Z (accessioned)
2020 (issued)
degree
Biomedical Engineering (discipline)
2025-05-18 (liftdate)
embargo
2025-05-18 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/96791 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
INVESTIGATIONS OF HEAD IMPACT FREQUENCY AND MAGNITUDE IN COLLEGIATE WOMEN’S SOCCER
type
Thesis

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