Home WakeSpace Scholarship › Electronic Theses and Dissertations

PRESIDENT LINCOLN AND THE RHETORICAL APPEALS OF WHITENESS AND COLONIZATION

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Item Files

Item Details

title
PRESIDENT LINCOLN AND THE RHETORICAL APPEALS OF WHITENESS AND COLONIZATION
author
Hilligoss, Derek John
abstract
President Lincoln has long been lauded as a key figure in history and in rhetoric. But the “Great Emancipator” before arriving on the Emancipation Proclamation first sought to expel black people from the nation as a way of ending the war. This thesis explores two speeches Lincoln gave in 1862 that were at the forefront of this proposal. Using a framework of interest convergent this thesis explores the rhetorical methods that Lincoln undertakes to craft his appeal. By using rhetoric of colonization Lincoln is seeking to appeal to both pro-slavery and anti-slavery whites to garner the needed support to enact his idea. Finally, the analysis drawn from the two speeches are applied to a study David Zarefsky undertook in regards to one of the speeches in 1862 to argue his “rhetorical leadership” is derived from his appeal to whiteness and colonization.
subject
Critical Race Theory
Lincoln
Rhetoric
contributor
Atchison, R. Jarrod (committee chair)
Von Burg, Alessandra (committee member)
Gill, Rebecca (committee member)
date
2020-05-29T08:36:09Z (accessioned)
2020-05-29T08:36:09Z (available)
2020 (issued)
degree
Communication (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/96850 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

Usage Statistics