Home WakeSpace Scholarship › Electronic Theses and Dissertations

BIO-INSPIRED HYDROGELS FOR PREDICTION OF DISEASE PROGRESSION AND CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC RESPONSE IN VITRO

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Item Files

Item Details

abstract
It has become well established that many 2-dimensional (2D) cell culture models are unable to adequately represent in vivo tissue and microenvironments. In response to this developed understanding, researchers have been focused on incorporating novel materials and extracellular matrix (ECM) components, physical and chemical cues, and mechanical components to cell culture, yielding 3-dimensional (3D) culture, and ultimately, the field of tissue engineering. However, many cell friendly biomaterials are often not advantageous for mechanical or chemical control and can be limiting during experimental design [1]. Yet the best mechanically and chemically controlled biomaterials are often limited in use due to synthetic origin and the need for harsh reagents that are toxic to cells [2]. These design constraints have opened the door to utilizing unique chemistries and components to create ideal biomaterials. The research conducted herein has leveraged natural polymers with unique chemical modifications to make controllable, ECM component modulating hydrogels for development of tissue models for the study of organ specific metabolism and cancer precision medicine applications. This research is comprised of 3 parts:
subject
contributor
Mazzocchi, Andrea (author)
Soker, Shay (committee chair)
Skardal, Aleksander (committee member)
Verbridge, Scott (committee member)
Rahbar, Elaheh (committee member)
Gmeiner, William (committee member)
date
2020-05-29T08:36:18Z (accessioned)
2020-11-28T09:30:11Z (available)
2020 (issued)
degree
Biomedical Engineering (discipline)
embargo
2020-11-28 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/96873 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
BIO-INSPIRED HYDROGELS FOR PREDICTION OF DISEASE PROGRESSION AND CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC RESPONSE IN VITRO
type
Dissertation

Usage Statistics