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Comparative Analysis of Neck Injury Prediction between Finite Element ATD’s and Human Body Models of Varying Complexity

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title
Comparative Analysis of Neck Injury Prediction between Finite Element ATD’s and Human Body Models of Varying Complexity
author
Johnson, Dale
abstract
The incident of neck injury is of particular concern when implementing occupant safety measures due to the surrounding anatomy and vital organs that rely on innervation from the cervical region. The present body of work was undertaken in an effort to advance the literature surrounding the neck injury prediction capabilities of a variety of computational models, both human and anthropomorphic test devices. This was achieved in two parts, comparison of a detailed, anatomically accurate human model to its simplified counterpart and between the aforementioned, detailed model and the Hybrid III finite element model. In each case, kinematics of the head and neck were evaluated as a basis for understanding the forces and moments reported by the models. A common injury metric, the neck injury criterion, was analyzed for both comparative studies outlined above. Correlates were derived in each study to allow for a relative approximation of forces and neck injury criterion. Efforts in the harmonization of instrumentation and development of post processing software for both data extraction and injury prediction was also accomplished. Ultimately, future work may utilize the findings of the present thesis in order to make inferences on the neck injury prediction of the employed computational models.
subject
GHBMC
human body model
Hybrid III
injury criteria
neck biomechanics
contributor
Gayzik, F. Scott (committee chair)
Weaver, Ashley A. (committee member)
Brown, Philip (committee member)
date
2020-08-28T08:35:22Z (accessioned)
2021-08-27T08:30:12Z (available)
2020 (issued)
degree
Biomedical Engineering (discipline)
embargo
2021-08-27 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/96941 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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