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THE N-2 TASK-SWITCHING PARADIGM AND ATTENTION-DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER

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abstract
Individuals with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have been shown to experience greater deficits in executive functioning (EF). While less is known about the extent to which deficits in EF continue into adulthood, research suggests that adults with ADHD have more difficulty on measures of EF that rely on inhibition (Boonstra et al., 2010). Task-switching paradigms are cognitive tasks that require behavioral inhibition, as one must be able to inhibit responses that are no longer relevant to the current task in order to readily shift from one task set to the next. Thus, task-switching paradigms provide a method to assess inhibition in adults with ADHD. The purpose of the current study was to examine task-switching performance to determine if there are differences in persisting inhibition in adults with ADHD. To test this hypothesis, performance on a task-switching paradigm with various response-cue intervals, an operation span task (OSPAN), and self-reported deficits in EF were compared between an ADHD and control group. The results showed that individuals in the ADHD group experienced persisting inhibition on the task-switching paradigm and performed as well as the control group on the OSPAN task but reported significantly more problems with EF. These results suggest that EF processes different from those involved in task-switching may be compromised in ADHD.
subject
ADHD
executive function
inhibition
repetition cost
task switching
contributor
Gallitano, Kaitlyn (author)
Jennings, Janine (committee chair)
Blumenthal, Terry (committee member)
Sali, Anthony (committee member)
date
2020-08-28T08:35:32Z (accessioned)
2020 (issued)
degree
Neuroscience – MS (discipline)
2022-08-27 (liftdate)
embargo
2022-08-27 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/96960 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
THE N-2 TASK-SWITCHING PARADIGM AND ATTENTION-DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER
type
Thesis

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