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EFFECTS OF STRESS AND ALCOHOL ON CATECHOLAMINES IN THE RAT BRAIN

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abstract
The prevalence of alcohol use disorder (AUD), a chronic, heterogeneous disease characterized by an escalation from casual alcohol consumption to compulsive alcohol seeking and consumption accompanied by a persistent or recurring negative affective state, is a health crisis occurring throughout the general population with many factors contributing to the development and continuance of this disease. Epidemiological data demonstrate AUD is commonly comorbid with other disorders, including anxiety and stress disorders. Further, there is preclinical and clinical evidence that stress and anxiety have an influential role in the escalation and maintenance of the cycle of alcohol abuse and addiction. Animal models have demonstrated that alcohol or stress exposure acts through common neurobiological substrates. By targeting these shared brain regions and circuitries, we can elucidate novel therapeutic targets to address the paucity of treatment options available for those suffering from AUD.
subject
Anxiety
Basolateral Amygdala
Dopamine
Locus Coeruleus
Medial Prefrontal Cortex
Norepinephrine
contributor
Deal, Alex Lynn (author)
Budygin, Evgeny A (committee chair)
Ferris, Mark J (committee member)
Maier, Joost X (committee member)
Rowland, Benjamin A (committee member)
date
2021-01-13T09:35:19Z (accessioned)
2021 (issued)
degree
Neuroscience (discipline)
2022-01-12 (liftdate)
embargo
2022-01-12 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/97948 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
EFFECTS OF STRESS AND ALCOHOL ON CATECHOLAMINES IN THE RAT BRAIN
type
Dissertation

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