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PREDICTORS OF CLINICALLY MEANINGFUL GAIT SPEED RESPONSE TO CALORIC RESTRICTION AMONG OLDER ADULTS PARTICIPATING IN WEIGHT LOSS INTERVENTIONS

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title
PREDICTORS OF CLINICALLY MEANINGFUL GAIT SPEED RESPONSE TO CALORIC RESTRICTION AMONG OLDER ADULTS PARTICIPATING IN WEIGHT LOSS INTERVENTIONS
author
Tse, Ka Ki
abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine whether select baseline characteristics influence the likelihood of an older adult experiencing a clinically meaningful gait speed response (±0.05 m/s) to caloric restriction. Individual level data from 1188 older adults participating in eight, five/six-month, dietary-based weight loss interventions were pooled, with treatment arms collapsed into caloric restriction (CR; n=667) or no caloric restriction (NoCR; n=521) categories. Poisson risk ratios (95% CI) were used to examine whether CR assignment interacted with select baseline characteristic subgroups (age, sex, race, BMI, comorbidity status, baseline gait speed, or inflammatory burden) to influence achievement of ±0.05 m/s fast gait speed change. Main effects were also examined. The study sample (69.5% female, 80.1% white) was 67.6±5.3 years old with a BMI of 33.8±4.4 kg/m2. Interaction effects were non-significant across all subgroups. However, those with low baseline gait speed were more likely to experience a clinically meaningful gait speed improvement; and, females and those with hypertension or CVD were more likely to experience a gait speed decrement, regardless of CR assignment (all p≤0.04). Compared with NoCR, CR does not result in a clinically meaningful change in gait speed among older adults. This finding is robust across several baseline subgroupings.
subject
Clinical trial
Gait speed
Obesity
Older adults
Physical function
Weight loss
contributor
Beavers, Kristen M (committee chair)
Messier, Stephen P (committee member)
Beavers, Daniel P (committee member)
date
2021-06-03T08:35:53Z (accessioned)
2022-06-02T08:30:11Z (available)
2021 (issued)
degree
Health and Exercise Science (discipline)
embargo
2022-06-02 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/98783 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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