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THE RELATIONSHIPS OF WEIGHT, WEIGHT LOSS, AND PHYSICAL FUNCTION IN OBESE PATIENTS FROM AN OUTPATIENT WEIGHT LOSS CLINIC

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title
THE RELATIONSHIPS OF WEIGHT, WEIGHT LOSS, AND PHYSICAL FUNCTION IN OBESE PATIENTS FROM AN OUTPATIENT WEIGHT LOSS CLINIC
author
Cuzzupe, Kelsey Ann
abstract
Background: More than 1/3rd of the American population is considered obese.1 Obesity has been linked to declines in mobility and physical functioning.2 Weight loss programs are used to combat obesity and have been shown to improve some measures of physical function (PF) including gait speed and chair rise time.3 It is important to determine if similar associations can be drawn from a community based weight management center. Objective: To determine if PF measures are associated with body mass, BMI, and weight loss among individuals enrolled in a community weight loss clinic. Methods: 132 patients were included in the pre-weight loss analysis with 83.3% of the patients being female, a median age of 48 ±12 years, and median BMI of 40±9 kg/m2. 22 patients were included in the post weight loss analysis (13 in medical program and 9 in surgical). Gait speed, chair rise time, and hand grip strength were the PF measures selected. Results: BMI was statistically significantly correlated with gait speed (r= -0.49, p<0.001), and chair rise time (r= 0.23, p=0.009), while body mass was correlated with gait speed (r= -0.347, p <0.001), chair rise time (r= 0.243, p=0.005), and handgrip strength (r=0.31, p =0.002). After weight loss, within group changes in gait speed and chair rise time were observed in the medical program, while only changes in gait speed were observed in the surgical program. Between program differences in weight loss were found to be statistically significant with the surgical group losing more weight than the medical group (26.6% vs. 12.7%, p= 0.002). Conclusion: Prior to weight loss, gait speed and chair rise time were associated with BMI. Both programs did see improvements in PF measures. The surgical program lost more weight than the medical program.
contributor
Miller, Gary (committee chair)
Berry, Michael (committee member)
date
2021-06-03T08:36:08Z (accessioned)
2021-06-03T08:36:08Z (available)
2021 (issued)
degree
Health and Exercise Science (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/98811 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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