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TALKING ACROSS THE AISLE: CAN DELIBERATION REDUCE PARTISAN BIAS?

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abstract
The political animosity that hovered over the 2020 election has been building for over a decade (Abramowitz, 2010; Iyengar, Sood, & Lelkes, 2012; Iyengar & Westwood, 2015). Though the causes and consequences of political polarization are well documented, the literature is comparably lacking in its identification of possible solutions. The present study aimed to address this limitation through the integration of three theories – social identity theory, intergroup contact theory, and deliberative democracy – to test whether interparty contact achieved through deliberation could effectively reduce partisan bias by improving self-reported instances of prejudice, discrimination and stereotyping. The results provide supportive evidence for the efficacy of interparty contact in improving prejudicial attitudes toward and stereotypical attributions of opposing party members, though no support was found for its effectiveness in improving discrimination.
subject
bias
deliberation
discrimination
partisanship
prejudice
stereotyping
contributor
Smith, Rebecca Nicole (author)
Fleeson, William (committee chair)
Miller, Christian (committee member)
Jayawickreme, Eranda (committee member)
date
2021-06-03T08:36:16Z (accessioned)
2021 (issued)
degree
Psychology (discipline)
2026-06-01 (liftdate)
embargo
2026-06-01 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/98826 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
TALKING ACROSS THE AISLE: CAN DELIBERATION REDUCE PARTISAN BIAS?
type
Thesis

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