Home WakeSpace Scholarship › Electronic Theses and Dissertations

DUAL-TARGETING THE DYNORPHIN/KAPPA OPIOID RECEPTOR AND DOPAMINE SYSTEMS FOR TREATMENT OF COCAINE USE DISORDER

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Item Files

Item Details

abstract
Decades of research have focused on discovering an effective pharmacotherapy for cocaine use disorder, and despite hundreds of clinical trials testing a wide range of cellular targets, there is still no FDA approved treatment for cocaine addiction. The work contained in this dissertation focuses on the dysregulation of the dopamine and dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor systems that occurs after repeated, high-dose cocaine exposure. These system changes result in a reward deficit, stress surfeit syndrome seen during withdrawal, which leads to greater drug intake and increases the propensity to relapse. The aim of this research was assessing the functional state of the kappa opioid receptor system after cocaine self-administration and the benefits of targeting this system—and its interactions with the dopamine system—to decrease cocaine self-administration and reverse neurobiological alterations resulting from cocaine exposure.
subject
Cocaine
Dopamine
Dynorphin
Kappa
Kappa Opioid Receptor
contributor
Estave, Paige (author)
Jones, Sara R (committee chair)
Nader, Michael A (committee member)
Ferris, Mark J (committee member)
Raab-Graham, Kimberly F (committee member)
date
2021-06-03T08:36:17Z (accessioned)
2021 (issued)
degree
Neuroscience (discipline)
2022-06-02 (liftdate)
embargo
2022-06-02 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/98829 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
DUAL-TARGETING THE DYNORPHIN/KAPPA OPIOID RECEPTOR AND DOPAMINE SYSTEMS FOR TREATMENT OF COCAINE USE DISORDER
type
Dissertation

Usage Statistics