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THE VIRTUALLY ENGAGING SOCIALLY WITH PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (VESPA) STUDY: A PILOT TRIAL

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title
THE VIRTUALLY ENGAGING SOCIALLY WITH PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (VESPA) STUDY: A PILOT TRIAL
author
Kershner, Kyle Isaac
abstract
The purpose of VESPA was to determine the feasibility and acceptability of virtual reality (VR) as a medium for remote group-mediated behavioral intervention delivery among older adults, and to explore the effect of a VR-delivered versus video-conference (VC)-delivered remote activity intervention on physical activity (PA) levels and social connection. Methods: We randomized 9 low-active older adults (66.8±4.8 years) to a 4-week home-based, group-mediated PA intervention delivered via either VR or VC. Analysis: Feasibility (i.e., number of participants reporting high levels of nausea, total sessions attended, adherence to behavioral prescription, number of VR accesses outside of scheduled meeting times) and acceptability (i.e., participant feedback on technological tools and program design) were illustrated via descriptive statistics. ANCOVA models were used to explore group differences in self-efficacy, social connection, and physical activity following the program. Results: All participants experienced low levels of VR related sickness and the ANCOVA models that revealed all participants improved in PA, functional performance, and the VR group had better social cognitive outcomes compared to the VC group. Discussion: VESPA suggests VR may be a useful medium for social physical activity programming in older adults and further work leveraging large samples and long follow-up durations is needed.
subject
Behavior
Exercise
Physical Activity
Self-Efficacy
Social Connection
Virtual Reality
contributor
Fanning, Jason (committee chair)
Brubaker, Peter H (committee member)
Brooks, Amber K (committee member)
date
2021-06-03T08:36:18Z (accessioned)
2021-06-03T08:36:18Z (available)
2021 (issued)
degree
Health and Exercise Science (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/98834 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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