Home WakeSpace Scholarship › Electronic Theses and Dissertations

SACRIFICE AND STRUGGLE: THE BAND OF DISSENTERS IN MAOIST CHINA

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Item Files

Item Details

abstract
The intellectual community in the People’s Republic of China had an intense relationship with the CCP in the 1950s and 1960s, especially during the mass campaigns such as the Hundred Flowers Campaign, the Anti-Rightist Campaign, and the Cultural Revolution. A suppression-resistance relationship developed in which the Party continued to perfect its methods of control, while some of the dissenting intellectuals banded together to carry on their cause. Previous scholars have produced some excellent studies on the Chinese intellectual community in general and many case studies on individual intellectuals’ resistance to the Party during this period; however, very few have examined the intellectual dissenters as communities. This thesis aims to fill this gap using the method of prosopography. Focusing on Lin Zhao’s and Yu Luoke’s communities active in the late 1950s and during the early years of the Cultural Revolution (1966 – 1970) respectively, this thesis explores the above-mentioned resistance-suppression relationship from the perspective of these dissenters and argues that while these dissenting communities shared much in common, the communities of the 1960s developed new methods to resist the Party’s ideological, political, and legal suppression.
subject
Anti-Rightist Campaign
Chinese intellectuals
Cultural Revolution
Maoist
contributor
Zhou, Zechuan (author)
Zhang, Qiong (committee chair)
Von Burg, Ronald (committee member)
Coates, Benjamin (committee member)
Lee, Wei-chin (committee member)
date
2021-09-01T08:35:28Z (accessioned)
2021 (issued)
degree
Liberal Arts Studies (discipline)
2026-09-01 (liftdate)
embargo
2026-09-01 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/99065 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
SACRIFICE AND STRUGGLE: THE BAND OF DISSENTERS IN MAOIST CHINA
type
Thesis

Usage Statistics