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ANALYSIS OF NOVEL MEDICAL DEVICE TECHNOLOGIES: TRUSST¬TM: FEMOROPLASTY IMPLANT AND INJECTION SYSTEM OSR-M1B: NON-VALVED PARTICULATE-FILTERING ELASTOMERIC HALF MASK RESPIRATOR

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title
ANALYSIS OF NOVEL MEDICAL DEVICE TECHNOLOGIES: TRUSST¬TM: FEMOROPLASTY IMPLANT AND INJECTION SYSTEM OSR-M1B: NON-VALVED PARTICULATE-FILTERING ELASTOMERIC HALF MASK RESPIRATOR
author
Ondar, Kyle Lucas
abstract
As the average age of the population increases, so does the number of patients with aging-related health conditions. Osteoporotic hip fractures create a large economic burden on the healthcare industry and studies have shown that there is positive correlation between hip fractures and fatalities. Many of the current treatment methods for fracture repair are either ineffective or highly invasive, requiring costly surgeries. Femoroplasty is a new technique developed to prevent femur fractures. The procedure involves injecting a large volume of bone cement into the femoral head and neck, strengthening the native bone. However, this technique can lead to tissue necrosis and other complications. We have developed a novel minimally invasive surgical intervention based on femoroplasty. It uses a reduced amount of cement as a jacket around a set of titanium pins to increase the strength of the femur and decrease the rate of complications. This study aims to characterize the efficacy and material properties of the composite implant system. We assessed the injectability of the cement in the novel injection system and quantified the mechanical performance of several combinations of cement type and pin geometries to determine which combination will provide the greatest mechanical performance within the femur.
subject
Clinical Trial
COVID-19
Femoroplasty
Implant and Injection
Medical Device
N95
contributor
Brown, Philip J (committee chair)
Roller, Brandon (committee member)
Urban, Jillian (committee member)
Bischoff , Wener (committee member)
date
2021-09-01T08:35:31Z (accessioned)
2023-08-31T08:30:04Z (available)
2021 (issued)
degree
Biomedical Engineering (discipline)
embargo
2023-08-31 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/99070 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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