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Not All Media Multitasking or Media Multitaskers are Equal: The Relationship Between Cognitive Demand, Self-Regulation, and Media Multitasking

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abstract
Media multitasking has become a popular topic of research as many studies have examined its effects on cognition following the work of Ophir et al. (2009). However, these studies have provided a mixed pattern of results. It is possible these inconsistent effects are due to a paradigmatic approach that treats all types of media multitasking behavior and individuals as the same. The current study was thus designed to address aspects of media multitasking that have typically been overlooked, such as the cognitive dimensions associated with different media combinations and self-regulation. It was hypothesized that individuals who report more frequent media multitasking and higher self-regulation would engage with less cognitively demanding media combinations. To examine this hypothesis, a diary questionnaire was created to assess the cognitive demands of different media combinations at five 12-hour intervals. Participants' media multitasking frequency, self-regulation, and self-reported attentional abilities were also assessed. Results failed to find the hypothesized interaction between self-regulation and media multitasking frequency, possibly due to sample size issues and a restricted range of media multitasking frequency. However, participants' diary entry scores appeared to be reliable across the testing intervals, suggesting the current approach could be fruitful for future research.
subject
cognitive demand
cognitive dimensions
media multitasking
self-regulation
contributor
Bales, Lauren Casey (author)
Jennings, Janine M (committee chair)
Dagenbach, Dale (committee member)
Friedman, Adam M (committee member)
Sali, Anthony W (committee member)
date
2021-09-01T08:35:46Z (accessioned)
2021 (issued)
degree
Psychology (discipline)
2023-08-31 (liftdate)
embargo
2023-08-31 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/99078 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
Not All Media Multitasking or Media Multitaskers are Equal: The Relationship Between Cognitive Demand, Self-Regulation, and Media Multitasking
type
Thesis

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