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FLAVONOLS PROTECT TOMATO POLLEN AND ROOTS FROM HEAT STRESS INCREASED REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES ACCUMULATION

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title
FLAVONOLS PROTECT TOMATO POLLEN AND ROOTS FROM HEAT STRESS INCREASED REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES ACCUMULATION
author
DeLange, Allison Michelle
abstract
Rising temperatures impair the development of reproductive and vegetative tissues resulting in lower crop yields through an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Plants can protect themselves from ROS through the localized synthesis of antioxidants, including flavonol metabolites. The tomato mutant, anthocyanin reduced (are), which has a defect in the gene encoding flavanone 3 hydroxylase (F3H) and reduced synthesis of flavonols, has impaired pollen function. We identified impaired pollen germination in the are mutant and increased ROS that are accentuated at elevated temperatures. Chemical complementation with flavonols and genetic complementation with an F3H transgene reversed the effect of elevated temperature on pollen germination in are and protected the parental line, VF36. In seedlings, heat stress impaired lateral root emergence and recovery from this stress was impaired in are. These effects were also reversed by genetic complementation with an F3H transgene. Consistent with plants modulating flavonol synthesis in response to stress as a protective mechanism, heat stress increased flavonols in both pollen and roots. Additionally, two thermotolerant cultivars also had higher levels of flavonols. These results demonstrated the protective capabilities of flavonols from heat-induced ROS and provide mechanisms for future development of approaches to safeguard plants against climate change.
subject
Flavonols
Heat-stress
Pollen
Reactive Oxygen Species
Reproduction
contributor
Muday, Gloria K (committee chair)
Dos Santos, Patricia (committee member)
McDonald Esstman, Sarah (committee member)
date
2022-01-15T09:35:29Z (accessioned)
2024-01-14T09:30:05Z (available)
2021 (issued)
degree
Biology (discipline)
embargo
2024-01-14 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/99383 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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