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NEWS FRAMES AND PUBLIC OPINION OF U.S. TAIWAN POLICY

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title
NEWS FRAMES AND PUBLIC OPINION OF U.S. TAIWAN POLICY
author
Ahmed, Habiba
abstract
News and scholarly headlines have routinely questioned if the People’s Republic of China (PRC) would pursue unification with Taiwan through military force. Despite the lack of formal obligations or treaty commitments to defend Taiwan, half of Americans in 2021 favored defending Taiwan if the PRC moved toward unification. Distrust of the PRC has also increased among the U.S. public, as well as media framing and discourse of Beijing. This study uses media effects theory to understand the variables that impact U.S. public opinion of Taiwan and grounds the research questions in U.S. policy of “strategic ambiguity,” a policy that seeks to dissuade war over Taiwan’s status by remaining deliberately vague about whether it will intervene and to what degree. The study employs a between-subjects experimental study with two manipulated conditions (Detailed frame x Vague frame) designed to test the impact of media frame effects on public opinion. While the study’s statistically significant results were limited, it is evident that the media’s level of detail in framing U.S. policies matters and may influence the public’s opinion on relevant topics. There was a statistically significant difference in the two manipulated conditions (detailed x vague) on public support for strategic ambiguity (SA), whereas those exposed to the detailed frame supported SA more than those exposed to the vague frame. It was also found that participants exposed to the detailed frame had less favorable views of China than participants exposed to the vague frame.
contributor
Krcmar, Marina (committee chair)
Louden, Allan (committee member)
Atchison, Jarrod (committee member)
date
2022-07-11T19:17:47Z (accessioned)
2024-05-23T08:30:06Z (available)
2022 (issued)
degree
Communication (discipline)
embargo
2024-05-23 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/101032 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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