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Parsons, David (Video interview)

History of Wake Forest University Oral Histories

Item Details

coverage
Winston-Salem (N.C.)
creator
Beverly, Parker
Parsons, David
date
2022-10-06T15:24:39Z
2022-10-06T15:24:39Z
2022-08-09
2022-10-06 (issued)
description
David Parsons graduated from Wake Forest University in 1971, majoring in psychology. In the interview, Parsons recalls selecting Wake as a potential school due to its catchy name and the first time he visited campus. He was amazed by the approachable and friendly professors which ultimately convinced him that the University was the right fit for him. Parsons decided early on that he wanted to join a fraternity in order to make more friends. He joined Sigma Phi Epsilon and lived with his brothers each year. Parsons was also involved with the Anthony Aston Society, though he states it was not as active as it is at present. Throughout the interview, David tells many interesting and fun stories from his fraternity memories and his involvement in theater productions.
format
video/mp4
29:10 minutes
Permalink
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/101375
language
English
relation
Special Collections and Archives
Z. Smith Reynolds Library
Wake Forest University
History of Wake Forest University Oral histories (RG53.1.2 )
rights
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Rights Statement
This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).
subject
Inclusive Student Life Collection
Summer 2022 Oral Histories
Wake Forest University--History
Anthony Aston Society
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Biology
Psychology
Theater
title
Parsons, David (Video interview)
type
Moving Image

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