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THE MORAL VALUE AND SELF-REGULATION OF RELATIONAL GOALS

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abstract
The purpose of this paper is to examine a new theoretical phenomenon that we call "moral potency," its connection to relational roles and relational goals, and the subsequent effect on self-regulation in relationships. Moral potency is defined as the product of the centrality of a goal to fulfilling the associated role and the moral value of the role. We propose that relational goals will have a higher degree of moral potency than non-relational goals, and that this increased moral potency will lead to greater self-regulatory success. Results showed that relational goals did have a higher degree of moral potency and show greater self-regulatory success, but this success is not a result of moral potency. Implications for future research within the identity, relationship, and moral literature are discussed.
subject
Goals
Identity
Moral
Relationships
Roles
Self-Regulation
contributor
Jenkins, Alicia Beth (author)
Kammrath, Lara K (committee chair)
Furr, R. Michael (committee member)
Massicampo, E.J. (committee member)
Canevello, Amy (committee member)
date
2013-06-06T21:19:37Z (accessioned)
2013-06-06T21:19:37Z (available)
2013 (issued)
degree
Psychology (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/38570 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
THE MORAL VALUE AND SELF-REGULATION OF RELATIONAL GOALS
type
Thesis

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