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REGRET AS A MODULATORY SYSTEM: HOW IMAGINED FUTURES BECOME REAL PASTS

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title
REGRET AS A MODULATORY SYSTEM: HOW IMAGINED FUTURES BECOME REAL PASTS
author
Valshtein, Timothy Jacob
abstract
The goal of this research was to empirically test a proposed theory that was developed to explain how humans simulate future undesirable outcomes, evaluate their past behaviors, and potentially grow from these experiences through anticipated and retrospective regret. Using a longitudinal design, we measured students’ study habit quality, study habit quantity, study goals, anticipated regret, retrospective regret, and behavior-goal inconsistency. From this, we proposed four specific hypotheses: (a) conscientiousness will moderate the relationship between study habits and anticipated regret, (b) anticipated regret will positively predict study habits mediated through anticipated inconsistency, (c) the consistency-fit mediation findings from Seta et al. (2001) will replicate such that poor decisions will predict increased levels of retrospective regret, mediated through behavioral-goal inconsistency (d) retrospective regret will predict future anticipated regret will be mediated through a desire to change future behavior. We found that conscientiousness may moderate the relationship between anticipated regret and study habits (though it does uniquely predict study habits), anticipated regret does positively predict study habits mediated through anticipated inconsistency, the consistency-fit mediation findings were replicated, and the relationship between retrospective regret and anticipated regret is moderated by a desire to change future behavior. These findings suggest that regret indeed plays an important and functional role in day-to-day self-regulation and goal-setting.
subject
Consistency-fit
Decision-making
Goal-setting
Modulatory
Regret
Self-regulation
contributor
Seta, Catherine E (committee chair)
Stone, Eric R (committee member)
Petrocelli, John V (committee member)
Rogan, Randall G (committee member)
date
2016-05-21T08:35:34Z (accessioned)
2016-05-21T08:35:34Z (available)
2016 (issued)
degree
Psychology (discipline)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/59271 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
type
Thesis

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