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Perceived Benefits of Peer Support Groups for Stroke Survivors and Caregivers in Rural North Carolina

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abstract
Despite the fact that peer support groups play an important role in stroke recovery by providing tools for effective coping, alleviating psychological stress, and creating an outlet for stroke survivors and caregivers, their perceived benefits have not been clearly defined for rural stroke survivors and their families. This qualitative study describes the experiences of stroke survivors and family caregivers in rural areas of North Carolina who have participated in stroke peer support groups. Four focus groups were conducted with thirty-two support group participants (average age 67 years, 72% female) in four rural North Carolina counties using a semi-structured discussion guide to learn about their experiences. Thematic analysis revealed that participants in rural support groups seek and receive knowledge from their support groups, that the shared experiences cultivate a sense of community among support group participants, and that participants also view support outside of the support group as a necessary component of their recovery process. These findings emphasize that peer support groups are a valuable resource for stroke survivors and caregivers, particularly in rural areas where access to resources is often limited.
subject
Social support
Stroke recovery
contributor
Christensen, Erin Rae (author)
Gesell, Sabina B (committee chair)
Salsman, John M (committee member)
Danhauer, Suzanne C (committee member)
date
2017-06-15T08:35:33Z (accessioned)
2019-06-14T08:30:11Z (available)
2017 (issued)
degree
Health Disparities in Neuroscience-related Disorders – MS (discipline)
embargo
2019-06-14 (terms)
identifier
http://hdl.handle.net/10339/82167 (uri)
language
en (iso)
publisher
Wake Forest University
title
Perceived Benefits of Peer Support Groups for Stroke Survivors and Caregivers in Rural North Carolina
type
Thesis

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